Local Rules

For handicap purposes, all Sweeny Cup games are posted as “tournament” scores.

All Golf Canada rules of golf apply.

The USGA and the R&A has announced a series of proposed changes to the Rules of Golf, which would take effect in 2019. Over the course of 2018 season Sweeny Cup will discuss how the rule changes may impact our games. Please download a copy of the changes and have it available for our discussions.

All players must abide by the LOCAL RULES listed on the scorecard, on-course signage, and the Sweeny Cup local rules below.

SWEENY CUP LOCAL RULES:

Winter Rules: Through the Green, the ball may be marked, lifted, cleaned and replaced within 6″ of its original position, no closer to the hole.

Summer Rules: Play the ball as it lies. Except under applicable rules, e.g., Identifying, Interference or Damage.

Preferred Lies: On the “closely mown area” (grass cut to fairway height) of the fairway of the hole the player is playing, the ball may be marked, lifted, cleaned and replaced within 6″ of its original position, no closer to the hole.

Embedded Ball: Through the green, a ball that is embedded in its own pitch-mark in the ground, other than sand, may be lifted without penalty, cleaned and dropped as near as possible to where it lay but not nearer the hole. The ball when dropped must first strike a part of the course through the green.

Stones in Bunkers: Stones in bunkers are movable obstructions (Rule 24-1 applies). They may be removed with no penalty.

Ground Under Repair (GUR): To take free relief from GUR, it must be clearly marked by white paint, a sign, or indicated on the scorecard. Follow the direction(s) regarding must take free relief or may take free relief.

Note: If it does not say must take relief then a player may play out of the GUR—no penalty.

Drop Zone: Play by the local rules at each club, i.e., a player either must or may use the drop area. If the sign doesn’t say either, then a player may use the drop area, it is her choice, or follow the rules of golf, i.e., hazard options.

If a player is unsure in any situation invoke rule 3-3 Doubt as to Procedure and play a second ball.

Doubt as to Procedure: (3-3)

a. If a player is doubtful of her rights or the correct procedure she may, without penalty, complete the hole with two balls.

After the doubtful situation has arisen and before taking further action, a player must announce to her marker or a fellow-competitor that she intends to play two balls and state which ball she wishes to count if the Rules permit. If a player fails to do so, the provisions of Rule 3-3b(ii) apply.

A player must report the facts of the situation to the Committee before returning her scorecard. If she fails to do so she will be disqualified.

One Ball Rule: Sweeny Cup does not require the “one” ball rule, i.e., a player must use same brand/model ball for the entire round. A player’s ball must be on the current List of Conforming Golf Balls issued by the United States Golf Association.

Practice 7-2. During Round

A player must not make a practice stroke during play of a hole.

Between the play of two holes, a player must not make a practice stroke, except that she may practice putting or chipping on or near:

a. the putting green of the hole last played,
b. any practice putting green, or
c. the teeing ground of the next hole to be played in the round,

provided a practice stroke is not made from a hazard and does not unduly delay play.

Distance-Measuring Devices: In all Sweeny Cup events a player may obtain distance information by using a device that measures distance only. However, if, during a stipulated round, a player uses a distance-measuring device that is designed to gauge or measure other conditions that might affect her play (e.g., gradient, wind-speed, temperature, etc.), she is in breach of Rule 14-3, for which the penalty is disqualification, regardless of whether any such additional functions are actually used.

Information regarding the distance between two objects is public information and not advice. It is therefore permissible for players to exchange information relating to the distance between two objects. For example, a player may ask anyone, including her opponent, or fellow-competitors the distance between her ball and the hole.

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